"To acknowledge our ancestors means we are aware that we did not make ourselves. We remember them because it is an easy thing to forget; that we are not the first to suffer, rebel, fight, love and die. The grace with which we embrace life, in spite of the pain, the sorrows, is always a measure of what has gone before."
- Alice Walker, “In These Dissenting Times” (via mal4suerte)

(Source: variationalbeings, via betotzin)

"The pull between what is and what should be. I believe that by changing ourselves we change the world, that traveling El Mundo Zurdo path is the path of a two-way movement—a going deep into the self and an expanding out into the world, a simultaneous recreation of the self and a reconstruction of society. And yet, I am confused as to how to accomplish this […] I can’t reconcile the sight of a battered child with the belief that we choose what happens to us, that we create our own world. I cannot resolve this in myself. I don’t know. I can only speculate, try to integrate the experiences that I’ve had or have been witness to and try to make some sense of why we do violence to each other. In short, I’m trying to create a religion not out there somewhere, but in my gut. I am trying to make peace between what has happened to me, what the world is, and what it should be."
- Gloria Anzaldúa, “La Prieta” (via whentherewerebicycles)

(via professormami)

litahalford:

it infuriates me when people tell me “lifes too short to not forgive people!” like NO lifes too short for me to continually allow abusive and manipulative behavior in my life and live in a constant state of anxiety bc I want to be “nice” or whatever

(via blackmagicmuxer)

articulatedacademic:

"… I use the word ‘love’ here not merely in the personal sense but as a state of being, or a state of grace - not in the infantile American sense of being made happy but in the tough and universal sense of quest and daring and growth."

articulatedacademic:

"… I use the word ‘love’ here not merely in the personal sense but as a state of being, or a state of grace - not in the infantile American sense of being made happy but in the tough and universal sense of quest and daring and growth."